Host Newsroom Testimonials

“The late Alfred Friendly did us an enormous favor. He created and endowed a program that has brought us, every year since it began in 1984, a third-world journalist of first-rate distinction… Their bylines enlarged our staff as they enlarged our understanding… We learned a lot more than we taught —about their nations, their cultures, their journalism, their aspirations.”

—Jim Naughton, late president of The Poynter Institute and editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Our newspaper has been a better place as a result of having [AFPP Fellows] in our midst; my feeling, too, is that each of them went home with a positive impression and some new ideas.”

—Howard Tyner, retired, former vice president, Tribune Publishing Company

“The program helps the fellows as well as the host papers to better understand and appreciate different cultures, races and values that stretch way beyond the differences in newspaper coverage.”

—Pete McConnell, four-time mentor, former reporter and editor the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and the Houston Chronicle

“The program… forces all of us who come into contact with these fellows to think about and explain why we do what we do. It also gives us a chance to spread the best values of journalism in ways we never could otherwise.”

—Peter Young, former executive at The New York Times and Bloomberg News, AFPP advisory board member

“Luis [Lopez Portillo] was a wonderful addition to our newsroom….He stimulated many of the editors and writers working with him… The Friendly Fellows make many similarly educated and trained American journalists answer questions about their craft on issues they took for granted.

—David Beard, formerly of the Sun-Sentinel and The Boston Globe.

“We made lasting friendships. We acquired resources in hotspots around the world. And we saw young journalists adopt our values and use them to grow in ability, self-esteem and responsibility. Bless Alfred Friendly for his legacy.”

— Jim Naughton, in 1996 while at the Philadelphia Inquirer

“We firmly believe that, with the legacy she (Mrs. Jean Friendly) left behind, the AFPP program will continue to thrive and to make its contribution to journalism and cultural exchanges between the United States and developing democracies.”

—Wang Jian, China Daily, 2005.

“Our Fellow from Cambodia was crucial in helping us develop contacts in the Cambodian community south of Seattle. His ability to cultivate sources and serve as an interpreter… enabled the P-I to better understand the events leading up to a police killing that involved a Cambodian suspect in 1997. Because of his work, the P-I was able to produce stories that had context and stretched beyond the limited information supplied by police sources.”

—Pete McConnell, while with the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 1997.